The Legacy of the Batman: Part 5 – Comic stories that were adapted for television

Batman1966Logo

In the previous two entries I highlighted individual comic book references that proved the series didn’t just draw from late 50’s-early 60’s comics as it has often been said. It drew elements from three an and half decades of comic book history.

With that said, in this particular entry I will look at the comic stories that were adapted for TV. In these Episodes and the Batgirl Network Presentation there are elements that were transferred over from the comics that they were based on. And then there are things that were altered for financial or artistic license reasons.

Season 1
Batman #171 May, 1965- “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler
Cover Artists Carmine Infantino and Murphy Anderson, Writer Gardener Fox, Penciler Sheldon Moldoff, and Inker Joe Giella

24-10-2012 13-07-44

Episode 1- “Hi Diddle Riddle” and Episode 2- “Smack in The Middle
Original Air date: 1/12/66 and 1/13/66
Written by Lorenzo Semple, Jnr. and Directed by Robert Butler

While a few elements from the “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler” are used in “Hi Diddle Riddle” and “Smack in The Middle.” The overall story is different from the “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler” in which The Riddler is jealous of the attention that the Mole-Hill Mob is getting from Batman. But in “Hi Diddle Riddle” and “Smack in The Middle” The Riddler actually works with The Mole-Hill Mob.

The episode begins with Commissioner Gordon reading out the following riddle, which is the first element that was taken from the “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler” story.

Why is an orange like a bell?
The answer is because they both must be peeled.

The Riddler then leaves them with another riddle this time via a recorded message. Like the previous riddle this riddle was also taken from the “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler.”

“There are three men in a boat with four cigarettes but no matches. How do they manage to smoke?”
The answer of course is with a cigarette lighter.

This leads us to the next element that was taken from the “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler.” Which was the idea of Batman and Robin peering through the window of Mr. Peale’s office where they find The Riddler threatening Mr. Peale of The Peale Art Gallery at gun point.

This springs them into action, but much to the embarrassment of Batman and Robin in both stories, it’s revealed that the gun The Riddler was pointing at Mr. Peale was actually a cigarette lighter. It’s then revealed that The Riddler wasn’t trying to steal the cross of the north from Mr. Peale, he had only come to collect it since he inherited it.

The Riddler leaving Batman and Robin a secret message on some paper. Is yet another element that was lifted from “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler.” The way how it’s used in the series differs.

In “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler” when Batman and Robin worked out that The Riddler was going to do something at The Peale Art Gallery, it was after they deciphered a secret riddle that The Riddler had written on a piece of paper.

In “Hi Diddle Riddle” Batman and Robin are sent a court summons by The Riddler on which they also find some secret writing which gives them a clue about The Riddler’s next crime.

Batman’s pursuit of The Riddler leads him to a nightclub once again how this is presented in the TV Series and the comics differs. The secret writing on the court summons leads them to a nightclub, where a member of the Mole-Hill Mob spikes Batman’s drink. In “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler” Batman and Robin finally managed to stop the Riddler in a nightclub.

Both stories feature a moment where Batman presses the dot on The Riddler’s costume. When Batman finally stopped The Riddler in a nightclub in “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler.” He deactivated The Riddler’s gimmicked costume by pressing the dot on his costume. In contrast to this nothing happens when Batman does the same thing in “Smack in The Middle.”

At the end of “Smack in The Middle” when Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson are relaxing in Wayne Manor. Dick Grayson is seen wearing a red sweater and Bruce Wayne is wearing an ascot much like they did in “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler.”

Batman #169 February, 1965- “Partners in Plunder
Cover Artist Carmine Infantino, Writer Ed Herron, Penciler Sheldon Moldoff, and Inker Joe Giella

24-10-2012 13-12-32

Episode 3- “Fine Feathered Finks” and Episode 4- “The Penguin’s a Jinx
Original Air date: 1/19/66 and 1/20/66
Written by Lorenzo Semple, Jnr. and Directed by Robert Butler

“Fine Feathered Finks” and “The Penguin’s A Jinx” took a lot of elements from the “Partners in Plunder” story. But these episodes also made some changes as well. The instantly noticeable one is the decision for Penguin to kidnap the movie star Dawn Robbins instead of stealing the jeweled meteorite.

Penguin taking advantage of the grand opening of a jewelry store by getting his henchmen to give away trick umbrellas outside the store. Is the first element from “Partners in Plunder” that’s used in the “Fine Feathered Finks” and “The Penguin’s a Jinx” episodes.

This next element to be lifted from “Partners in Plunder” is the idea of unsuspecting customers taking their umbrellas into the store and asking for a prize much to the surprise and confusion of the shop owner. When the umbrellas are opened they begin to let off smoke lightning.

Someone shouting out for The Police who contact Commissioner Gordon, who contacts Batman to inform him of what just happened. Is another element that was also taken from “Partners in Plunder.”

Batman and Robin’s unsuccessful attempt to arrest Penguin when more free umbrellas were given away. Is yet another common element in both stories, what happens before and after that differs.

In “Fine Feathered Finks” when Batman and Robin leave Penguin’s shop one of the Penguin’s henchmen drops a giant umbrella in the middle of the street. Attached to the handle of this giant umbrella was a smaller multi-colored umbrella which Batman retrieves for analysis.

In “Partners in Plunder” the multi-colored umbrella wasn’t actually attached to a giant umbrella like it was in the “Fine Feathered Finks” episode. It was attached to another umbrella that was the same size. A giant umbrella is used in the “Partners in Plunder” story, but it was seen by Batman and Robin before they went to Penguin’s shop to arrest him.

Penguin learning of Batman and Robin’s plan to protect something via a transmitter in an umbrella is also an idea that was used in the “Partners in Plunder story.” In “The Penguin’s a Jinx,” Batman and Robin initially suspect that Penguin is planning to steal the jeweled meteorite, like he did in “Partners in Plunder” but they dismiss this idea when they remember how heavily it is guarded. Penguin who was listening to this conversation learns of Batman and Robin’s plan to protect the movie star Dawn Robbins, through a secret radio transmitter in the umbrella that was retrieved by Batman.

Penguin trapping Batman and Robin with his Penguin Magnet to stop them from ruining his plan was the final thing to be taken from “Partners in Plunder.” Once he had done this in “Partners in Plunder” he would go on to steal the jeweled meteorite. In “Fine Feathered Finks” he followed this up by kidnapping the movie star Dawn Robbins.

Batman #73 October, 1952- “The Joker’s Utility Belt
Cover Artist Dick Sprang, Writer David Vern Reed, Penciler Dick Sprang, and Inker Charles Paris

Batman_36

Episode 5- “The Joker Is Wild
Original Air date: 1/26/66
Written by Robert Dozier and Directed by Don Weis

The episodes “The Joker Is Wild” and “Batman Is Riled” feature a lot of things that came from “The Joker’s Utility Belt.” But as is the case with many of these episodes the way how certain things are used differs.

The Joker’s annoyance at not being included in the Gotham Museum of Modern Art’s comedian’s hall of fame was the first thing to be taken from “The Joker’s Utility Belt.”

The Joker’s attempt to get back at the Museum of Modern Art for not recognizing his “talent” leads to fight with Batman and Robin. During which an object falls from the wall and hits Batman in the head. This was also something that came from “The Joker’s Utility Belt.”

As was the idea of Batman using a gas pellet to escape from The Joker and his henchmen who were taking him and Robin to their hideout.

It’s at this point in the story when The Joker decides to create his own utility belt.

For his next crime The Joker committed a crime that was linked to the opera Pagliacci. In “The Joker’s Utility Belt” The Joker robs the box office at the civic opera during the opera Pagliacci. But The Joker in “The Joker Is Wild” actually participates in the opera as Pagliacci to lure and Batman and Robin to the opera so that he could unmask them on live television.

Episode 6- “Batman Is Riled
Original Air date: 1/27/66
Written by Robert Dozier and Directed by Don Weis

Batman finding out The Joker’s next crime through a media outlet comes from “The Joker’s Utility Belt.” Though in “The Joker’s Utility Belt” Batman works out The Joker’s plan by reading a newspaper. In “Batman Is Riled” Batman, Robin, and Alfred, work out The Joker’s next crime by watching a News Broadcast which had been hijacked by The Joker.

Another common element in both stories was The Joker luring Batman and Robin to properties owned by Professor Laughwell. During this 2nd confrontation The Joker manages to put a replica of his utility belt on Batman. When Batman tried to stop The Joker and his henchmen with a smoke pellet it burst into things that he wouldn’t expect like flags that were designed to taunt him and Robin.

Later on in the story The Joker presents what looks to be an ordinary cork which will replace the real cork. So that when Batman smashes the bottle against the S.S. Gotham steamship a cloud of paralyzing gas would be released.

There is a difference though in “The Joker’s Utility Belt,” after suspecting that something was wrong Batman switches the champagne bottles to prevent the paralyzing gas from being released. A woman unknowingly takes the original bottle and smashes it against the S.S. Gotham thus releasing the paralyzing gas. With Batman and Robin legitimately out cold The Joker’s henchmen were able to carry them off to The Joker’s hideout.

In “Batman Is Riled” when Batman suspected that something was wrong, he and Robin prepared for the release of the paralyzing gas. By taking what was later revealed to be universal drug antidote pills. So they tricked The Joker and his henchmen by allowing themselves to be captured and taken to The Joker’s hideout.

Although the final moments in both stories differ one element remains the same. And that is the fact that during the final fights in both stories Batman grabs The Joker’s utility belt and throws it into something to cause havoc.

Batman #121 February, 1959- “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero
Cover Artist Curt Swan, Writer David Wood, Penciler Sheldon Moldoff, and Inker Charles Paris

img447

Episode 7- “Instant Freeze” and Episode 8- “Rats Like Cheese
Original Air date: 2/2/66 and 2/3/66
Written by Max Hodge and Directed by Robert Butler

The episodes “Instant Freeze” and “Rats Like Cheese” made several alterations to the elements that were transferred over from “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero.” The major difference is that the servant of the princess who is robbed in the story is seemingly killed. When Mr. Freeze in “Instant Freeze” freezes the servant to stop him from ringing the alarm which causes him to fall over and shatter to pieces. Although in the episode “Rats Like Cheese” Princess Sandra confirms that he somehow arrived.

Later on in “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero” story, Mr. Zero escapes from the police by freezing their police car, but at the beginning of the episode “Instant Freeze” Mr. Freeze freezes the ground to prevent a motorcycle cop from stopping him.

An ice cream truck is used as the getaway vehicle for Mr. Zero and Mr. Freeze in their respective stories.

It’s explained in a flashback that Mr. Zero’s transformation came about after a lab accident with freeze solution. In the TV Series it’s said that Dr. Schimmel the man who became Mr. Freeze also became a villain after an accident with freeze solution, however, his origin differs because Batman blamed himself for Dr. Schimmel’s transformation. A beaker of freeze solution had been knocked onto Dr. Schimmel during his fight with Batman.

A hideout equipped with specialized areas for the villain and his henchmen was an idea that was used in “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero.” In which Mr. Zero had an air conditioned area for himself while his henchmen had a heated couch for themselves. But in “Instant Freeze” and Rat’s Like Cheese” Mr. Freeze uses a portable remote panel device to create a cold zone for himself and a hot zone for his butler and henchmen.

The idea of Mr. Freeze robbing a jewellery exchange also comes from “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero.” Though there is difference with how it was presented in the TV series; after robbing the jewellery exchange in “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero,” Mr. Zero prevents Batman and Robin from following him by freezing the ground. But Mr. Freeze in “Instant Freeze” after robbing the Gotham City Diamond Exchange prevented Batman and Robin from following him by freezing the engine of the Batmobile.

Another idea taken from “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero” is the idea of Mr. Freeze being delivered to the Gotham City Hotel in a storage box, the idea to steal the princess’s jewellery following that differs from what happens in “Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero.” As Mr. Zero ordered his goons to steal the tiara and diamond pendant from the princess. Whereas Mr. Freeze in “Instant Freeze” demands that the princess gives him her diamond pendant.

The villain doing something to keep Batman and Robin occupied as he escapes is a common element in “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero” and “Instant Freeze.”

Max Hodge the writer of these episodes came up with the alias Dr. Schimmel for Mr. Freeze this alias was only used in these episodes, it has never been used by Mr. Freeze in the comics or in his other media adaptations.

“The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero” and “Rats Like Cheese” both end with Batman punching the villain. In “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero” Batman decks Mr. Zero to prevent him from refreezing him into a block of ice, whereas Batman in “Rats Like Cheese” decked Mr. Freeze who was taunting him.

Detective Comics #346 December, 1965- “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap
Executive Editor Julius Schwartz, Cover Artists Carmine Infantino and Joe Giella, Writer John Broome, Penciler Sheldon Moldoff, Inker Joe Giella, and Editor Julius Schwartz

ab_34645_0_DetectiveComics346BatmansInesc

Episode 9- “Zelda The Great” and Episode 10- “A Death Worse Than Fate
Original Air date: 2/9/66 and 2/10/66
Written by Lorenzo Semple, Jnr. and Directed by Norman Foster

The episodes “Zelda The Great” and “A Death Worse Than Fate” took a few elements from “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap.” One of the notable differences is that the writer Lorenzo Semple, Jnr. decided to kill off the mobsters who tried to kill Batman and Robin in a crossfire attack.

The episode “Zelda The Great” and “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” both start off with a bank robbery. In both stories the night watchmen shoots at the robber. While he misses in “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” he actually shoots the robber in “Zelda The Great” but his bullets have no effect. The night watchmen in “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” is then hit in the face with a money filled valise outside the bank. Whereas the robber whacks the night watchmen in the face with their valise inside the bank in “Zelda The Great.”

The characters who wonder why someone would need to steal $100,000 every year differed. Because in “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” its Bruce Wayne and Dick Grayson who wonder why a criminal would need to steal $100,000 each year, but in “Zelda The Great” it’s Batman and Robin who try to work out why a criminal would need to steal $100,000 each year.

The idea of Eivol Ekdal the creator of the inescapable doom-trap, working with a phony escape artist is used in both stories. The phony escape artist that he works with in “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” is a man called The Great Carnado. In an attempt to give the show more female villains he works with a female phony escape artist called Zelda The Great in “Zelda The Great” and “A Death Worse Than Fate.”

In another element taken from “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap,” Zelda The Great, much like The Great Carnado is shocked when she was testing the inescapable doom-trap. Though Eivol Ekdal wouldn’t tell Zelda The Great how to escape the inescapable doom-trap until she paid him $100,000, whereas Eivol Ekdal in “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap,” wouldn’t tell The Great Carnado how to escape the doom-trap unless he was paid another $100,000.

Batman being lured into the inescapable doom-trap is another element from “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap.” In “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” Batman chased the Great Carnado into an old house and gets caught in the inescapable doom-trap, but Batman in “A Death Worse Than Fate” worked out the location of Eivol Ekdal’s workshop and is then lured into his doom-trap. In “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” the inescapable doom-trap was destroyed in the old house that Batman was lured into. But it was destroyed in Eivol Ekdal’s workshop in “A Death Worse Than Fate.”

Batman’s initial attempts to escape the doom-trap in both stories aren’t successful; he gets gassed and electrified when he tries to remove the grating from the floor of the doom-trap, eventually he escapes from the trap by placing a utility belt onto the vent thus causing the trap to blow up. In “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” it was his utility belt that he used to do this, but in “A Death Worse Than Fate” Batman borrowed Robin’s utility belt to do this.

Batman’s final confrontation with Eivol Ekdal also differs. Despite not leaving any clues behind Batman and Robin in “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” were able to track down Eivol Ekdal at his workshop. Where they were lured into a crossfire attack by Eivol Ekdal and The Great Carnado. In “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” the mobsters who paid $100,000 for a chance to kill Batman and Robin failed in their crossfire attack but they survived.

In “A Death Worse Than Fate” Batman and Robin tracked down Eivol Ekdal to his workshop with the help of a clue that “Zelda The Great” left with Aunt Harriet. When they arrived at Eivol Ekdal’s workshop they were lured into the inescapable doom-trap upon escaping from the doom-trap they were met by two mobsters who paid $100,000 for a chance to kill them. In “A Death Worse Than Fate” the mobsters who paid for a chance to kill Batman and Robin accidentally kill each other after failing to kill Batman and Robin in a crossfire attack.

In the aftermath of the crossfire attacks in both stories a villain tries to escape, but the villain who tries to escape are stopped by Batman. In the comic The Great Carnado tried to escape, but was bowled over, after Batman had punched one of the mobsters into him. In the series Eivol Ekdal tried to escape, but he was prevented from escaping after being hit in the back of the head with a batarang.

Someone suddenly remembering where they had seen Eivol Ekdal’s accomplice before is the final thing to be taken from “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap.” In the final panel of “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap” Dick Grayson suddenly realizes that The Great Carnado was a famous escape artist that he was previously aware of. In “A Death Worse Than Fate” prior to going to Eivol Ekdal’s workshop Robin works out that the escape artist that Evol Ekdal is working with is none other than Zelda The Great who was a magician that he was taken to see as a child.

Batman #161 February, 1964- “The New Crimes of the Mad Hatter
Cover Artist Sheldon Moldoff, Writer David Wood, Penciler Sheldon Moldoff, and Inker Charles Paris

Batman_161

Detective Comics #230 April, 1956- “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City
Executive Editor Whitney Ellsworth, Cover Artists Win Mortimer and George Roussos, Writer Bill Finger, Penciler Sheldon Moldoff, Inker Charles Paris, and Editor Jack Schiff

Detective_Comics_230

Episode 13- “The Thirteenth Hat” and Episode 14- “Batman Stands Pat
Original Air date: 2/23/66 and 2/24/66
Written by Charles Hoffman and Directed by Norman Foster

In the first of three episodes that drew from not one, but two comic stories. “The Thirteenth Hat” and “Batman Stands Pat” transfers a few elements over from “The New Crimes of the Mad Hatter” and “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City” stories. Despite that fact, these episodes are more like “The New Crimes of the Mad Hatter” in which the Mad Hatter fails to steal Batman’s cowl in his first appearance.

The Batman TV Series didn’t really delve into the back stories or even use the real names of the pre-existing villains from the comics. In this episode an exception is made when Commissioner Gordon refers to Mad Hatter by his real name which of course is Jervis Tetch. This makes him the only villain from the comics to be referred to by his real name.

Crimes involving firefighting paraphernalia are used in both stories. In “The New Crimes of the Mad Hatter” Mad Hatter and his henchmen rob the Gotham trust company while wearing fireman’s uniforms. But in “The Thirteenth Hat,” Commissioner Gordon informs Batman that Mad Hatter has just stolen a fire chief’s hat, and the fire chief that was wearing the hat.

Another element taken from “The New Crimes of the Mad Hatter,” was the idea of Mad Hatter stealing the hats of everybody who testified against him in court.

Batman and Robin in both “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City ” and “The Thirteenth Hat,” go to a sculptor to get sculpture of themselves made, but Mad Hatter switches places with the sculptor in order to get his hands on Batman’s cowl.

Mad Hatter succeeded in obtaining Batman’s cowl in “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City,” but this doesn’t actually happen in “The Thirteenth Hat” as Mad Hatter doesn’t get his hands on Batman’s cowl until episode 69 “The Contaminated Cowl.”

With the help of homing transmitters in hats Batman in “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City” and “Batman Stands Pat,” is able to track down Mad Hatter at his hideout.

The idea of Batman being held up at gun point upon his arrival at Mad Hatter’s hideout is used in both stories. However, Batman is only asked to unmask in front of Mad Hatter and his henchmen at gun point in “Batman Stands Pat.”

The next element also differs as Batman only snaps a loose turban in the face of Mad Hatter in “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City.” But in “Batman Stands Pat” he snaps a loose turban at Mad Hatter and his henchmen.

After Batman and Robin’s fight with Mad Hatter and his henchmen the police (in both stories) show up to arrest Mad Hatter, and it’s said that Mad Hatter will now serve a long sentence in prison.

Batman #35 June, 1946 – “Nine Lives has the Catwoman
Executive Editor Whitney Ellsworth, Cover Artist Dick Sprang, Writer Bill Finger, Penciler Bob Kane, Inker Ray Burnley, Letterer Ira Schnapp,

Batman_35

Batman #39 February, 1947 – “A Christmas Tale
Executive Editor Whitney Ellsworth, Cover Artists Jack Burnley, Charles Paris, Ira Schnapp, Writer Bill Finger, Penciler Bob Kane, Inker Ray Burnley, Letterer Ira Schnapp,

Batman_39

 

Season 1
Episode 19 – “The Purr-fect Crime” and Episode 20 – “Better Luck Next Time
Original Air date: 3/16/66 and 3/17/66
Teleplay & Story by Stanley Ralph Ross & Lee Orgel

Batman: The Movie
Release Date: 7/30/66 Austin Texas Premiere, 8/3/66/ General Release,
Story by Lorenzo Semple, Jnr., Directed by Leslie H. Martinson,

Season 2
Episode 67 – “The Sandman Cometh” and Episode 68 – “The Catwoman Goeth
Original Air date: 12/18/66 and 12/29/66
Teleplay by Ellis St. Joseph and Charles Hoffman, Story by Ellis St. Joseph

Episode 74 – “That Darn Catwoman” and Episode 75 – “Scat! Darn Catwoman
Original Air date: 1/19/67 and 3/25/67
Teleplay and Story by Stanley Ralph Ross, Directed by: Oscar Rudolph,

The first Catwoman episode in the series is a complicated one to analyze. Unlike episodes for other villains in the series which drew from one or two comic stories. The first Catwoman episode drew from two comic stories while using elements from 1 of the 2 stories in Batman: The Movie and episodes in Season 2.

Stolen cats are used in the crimes of Catwoman in “A Christmas Tale” and “The Purr-fect Crime.” Though I must point out that Catwoman used real cats in “A Christmas Tale” while golden cat statues were used in “The Purr-fect Crime.”

Even Catwoman’s own henchmen are not safe from being abused by her in “A Christmas Tale” she hit her henchman with her cat o nine tails because he was about to kill an unconscious Batman. In “The Purr-fect Crime” Catwoman cracked her cat o nine tails at her henchmen who were only admiring the golden cat statue which Catwoman had just stolen.

Catwoman has a pet cat called Hecate in “Nine Lives has the Catwoman.” Catwoman also has a pet cat in the episode “The Purr-fect Crime” but it’s only ever referred to as Hecate in Batman: The Movie.

Cats in boxes are used in “A Christmas Tale” and “The Purr-fect Crime” how they’re used is a different matter altogether. One of the stolen cats in “A Christmas Tale” is used to attack a detective called O’Hara when it springs out of a jewelry box. At the start of the episode “The Purr-fect Crime”a kitten in a box is delivered to Commissioner Gordon as a clue.

Batman uses an ingenious idea to track down Catwoman in “Nine Lives has the Catwoman.” In which he paints the floor around a captured Catwoman henchman with infra-red paint. This allowed him and Robin to follow the henchman to Catwoman’s maze lair upon his release. Their TV counterparts also use an ingenious idea to track down Catwoman in “Better Luck Next Time” in which they track down Catwoman with the help of Radioactive Mist which they sprayed the Golden Cat Statues with.

Batman and Robin went into Catwoman’s maze lair together in “Nine Lives has the Catwoman.” But Batman was separated from Robin both times when a maze was used in Season 1 Episode 19 – “The Purr-fect Crime” and Season 2 Episode 68 – “Catwoman Goeth.”

Catwoman didn’t really have “nine lives” in “Nine Lives has the Catwoman” but she had convinced her henchmen that she did. Having said that she still survives several certain death situations in the story. The “nine lives”of a cat myth is really only played up in 2 Catwoman episodes in the series.

Although the circumstances differed Catwoman loses one of her “nine lives” after falling into something. In “Nine Lives has the Catwoman” Batman assumes that Catwoman is dead when she seemingly plunges to her death after falling into a cataract. In “The Purr-fect Crime” Catwoman falls into a bottomless pit, but Adam West’s Batman is more positive about seeing her again because of the myth that Cats are supposed to have “nine lives.

Earlier on in the “Nine Lives has the Catwoman” Batman suspects that Catwoman is dead when she falls off a dirigible and lands in the sea. His TV counterpart initially thinks the same after she falls off the waterfront building and lands in the sea in Season 2 Episode 75 – “Scat! Darn Catwoman.”

Batman #53 June, 1949- “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground!
Executive Editor Whitney Ellsworth, Cover Artists Jim Mooney, Ray Burnley, Ira Schnapp, Pencilers Bob Kane, Lew Sayre Schwartz, Inker Charles Paris, and Letterer Ira Schnapp

f5_125441_0_AHairpinAHoeAHacksawAHoleInThe

Episode 25- “The Joker Trumps an Ace” and Episode 26- “Batman Sets the Pace
Original Air date: 4/6/66 and 4/7/66
Written by Francis & Marian Cockrell and Directed by Richard C. Sarafian

Despite the fact that they are mentioned in the title of this comic a hacksaw and a hoe are only really used as clues in “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground!.” They’re not even referenced in the episodes “The Joker Trumps an Ace” and “Batman Sets the Pace.”

Aside from that “The Joker Trumps an Ace” and “Batman Sets the Pace” did feature other elements from the “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground!” story.

The first of which is the idea of The Joker robbing a lady’s hairpin. Although the lady that he robbed in “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground” was in a jewellery store, while the lady he robbed in “The Joker Trumps an Ace” was in a fur salon.

And the idea of The Joker stealing a hole at the winnie-koh-toh country club, which happens on-panel in “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground!,” but it happens off screen in “The Joker Trumps an Ace.”

In both stories Commissioner Gordon’s summons Batman and Robin to his office where they learn about the next crime that The Joker was planning through a record that was sent to the Gotham City Police Department.

The crime that The Joker was planning involved stealing the Maharajah of Nimpah’s golden golf clubs, but while both stories feature the idea of the Maharajah of Nimpah getting a hole in one, which activates a gas bomb as the ball hits a hairpin that was in the hole. It was only in “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground!,” that The Joker’s henchmen would steal the Maharajah’s golden golf clubs, because The Joker’s henchmen in “The Joker Trumps an Ace” steal the Maharajah’ s golden golf clubs as well as kidnapping the Maharajah himself.

The Joker leading Batman and Robin to a location where he seemingly has them right where he wants them. Only to then allow them to escape from a gas based deathtrap is also from “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground!”

The Maharajah of Nimpah was a different person altogether in “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground!.” But in “Batman Sets the Pace” it was revealed that The Joker was pretending to be the Maharajah of Nimpah, so that he could claim $250 million dollars in ransom money.

Detective Comics #341 July, 1965- “The Joker’s Comedy Capers
Executive Editor Julius Schwartz, Cover Artists Carmine Infantino and Joe Giella, Writer John Broome, Penciler Carmine Infantino, Inker Joe Giella, and Editor Julius Schwartz

e3_34640_0_DetectiveComics341TheJokersCom

Episode 31- “Death in Slow Motion” and Episode 32- “The Riddler’s False Notion
Original Air date: 4/27/66 and 4/28/66
Written by Dick Carr and Directed by Charles R. Rondeau

As you can see these episodes were based on what was originally a story for The Joker, the producers of the series probably turned this into an episode for The Riddler. Since 2 out of the 34 episodes in Season 1 were already based on comic book stories for The Joker, and there weren’t many comic stories that they could’ve drawn on for The Riddler.

They had already used Batman #171 May, 1965- “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler” for Season 1 Episodes 1 and 2. Detective Comics #140 October, 1948- “The Riddler” was later adapted for Season 2 Episodes 79 and 80. That only left Detective Comics #142 December, 1948 – Crime’s Puzzle Contest which was the only other pre-1966 comic story that they couldv’e drawn from for The Riddler.

Having said that “Death in Slow Motion” and “The Riddler’s False Notion” only used three elements from “The Joker’s Comedy Capers” story.

One of which was the idea of a villain dressing up as Charlie Chaplain to commit a robbery. In “The Joker’s Comedy Capers” The Joker dressed as Charlie Chaplain robs a bank, but in “Death in Slow Motion” The Riddler dressed as Charlie Chaplain to rob a movie theatre.

The Riddler and his followers being highly amused by their film in “Death in Slow Motion,” recalls a similar idea taken from “The Joker’s Comedy Capers,” in which The Joker and his henchmen were amused while watching the film of a crime that they had committed.

The idea of an eccentric millionaire with a love for silent movies was also taken from “The Joker’s Comedy Capers.” Although The Joker wrote a series of slapstick crimes in the style of old movies for Mr Van-Van Laugh, but Mr. Van-Van Laugh had no idea that they were actually real crimes that The Joker was committing. While The Riddler used his film as a smokescreen for his real crime, which was to steal all of Mr Van Jones priceless silent films and hold them for ransom.

Season 2
Batman #36 Aug-Sep, 1946- “The Penguin’s Nest
Executive Editor Whitney Ellsworth, Cover Artists Dick Sprang and Ira Schnapp, Writer Alvin Schwartz, Penciler Paul Cooper, Inker Ray Burnley, and Letterer Ira Schnapp

Batman_36 (1)

Episode 61- “The Penguin’s Nest” and Episode 62 “The Bird’s Last Jest
Original Air date: 12/7/66 and 12/8/66 Written by Lorenzo Semple, Jnr. and Directed by Murray Golden

A few elements were taken from the “Penguin’s Nest,” such as the idea of Penguin opening a restaurant and getting his customers to sign their orders with their signatures, in order for him to be able to collect their handwriting samples.

The main element taken from “The Penguin’s Nest” was the idea of Penguin being ever so eager to get himself arrested, so that he could give the handwriting samples that he collected to a well known forger who was doing a life sentence at Gotham State Penitentiary.

The comic story and TV Series episode of the same name begin with the idea of Penguin’s customers wondering why they need to sign their orders with their signatures. In the comic version Bruce Wayne and Commissioner Gordon find it odd that Penguin’s customers have to give him copies of their handwriting samples. But in the series it’s Bruce Wayne, Chief O’Hara, and Commissioner Gordon, who find it odd that Penguin’s customers have to give him copies of their handwriting samples.

The idea of Penguin getting caught stealing an item from one of his customers. Also differed from what was done in the comic because in the comic version, Penguin was caught stealing an unknown women’s purse, but in the TV series it was Aunt Harriet’s diamond bracelet that he was caught stealing.

It’s naturally suggested that Penguin should be arrested after this, but someone suggests otherwise. In the comic version it’s Batman who insists that Commissioner Gordon shouldn’t arrest Penguin. But in the TV series Bruce Wayne insists that Chief O’Hara shouldn’t arrest Penguin because Penguin wants to be arrested.

In yet another attempt to get himself arrested Penguin in both stories, decides to launch a cream pie into Commissioner Gordon’s face. The aftermath of this incident also differed as well, in the comic version Batman and Robin much to his dismay help the Penguin to escape, before Commissioner Gordon is able to arrest him. In the TV series Batman suggests that Penguin shouldn’t be arrested until they find out why he wants to be arrested.

In both stories Penguin continually attempts to get himself arrested, so that he could hand over the handwriting samples that he collected to a well known forger who was doing time at the Gotham State Penitentiary.

What happens when Penguin is finally arrested differs once he is arrested in the comic version he’s seen bickering in a cell with Stickney Withers. The forger that he was planning to give the handwriting samples to. In the TV series when Penguin was finally arrested, and was planning to give the handwriting samples that he collected to Ballpoint Baxter, who was regarded as the best forger in the country, he was told that Bruce Wayne was helping to release Ballpoint Baxter on parole the same day that Penguin was returning to prison.

Detective Comics #230 April, 1956- “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City
Executive Editor Whitney Ellsworth, Cover Artists Win Mortimer and George Roussos, Writer Bill Finger, Penciler Sheldon Moldoff, Inker Charles Paris, and Editor Jack Schiff

Detective_Comics_230

Episode 69- “The Contaminated Cowl” and Episode 70- “The Mad Hatter Runs Afoul
Original Air date: 1/4/67 and 1/5/67
Written by Charles Hoffman and Directed by Oscar Rudolph

The episodes “The Contaminated Cowl” and “The Mad Hatter Runs Afoul” are like comic stories that are covered in more than issue. Because they are a continuation of the episodes “The Thirteenth Hat” and “Batman Stands Pat” in which The Mad Hatter fails to steal Batman’s cowl.

Only a handful of things from “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City” were used in the episodes “The Contaminated Cowl” and “Batman Runs Afoul.”

Like The Green Derby restaurant which was still in business in “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City,” but in “The Contaminated Cowl” The Green Derby was an abandoned restaurant that Mad Hatter used as his base of operations.

Another element that was transferred over from “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City,” was the idea of Mad Hatter spraying Batman’s cowl with radioactive spray. But only in “The Contaminated Cowl” does Batman’s cowl turn pink after being sprayed with Mad Hatter’s radioactive spray.

In the final element used in both stories Mad Hatter disguises himself as a lab worker so that he could steal Batman’s cowl at an atomic energy experimental building.

Batman #130, March 1960-“Batman’s Deadly Birthday
Cover Artist Sheldon Moldoff, Writer Bill Finger, Penciler Dick Sprang, and Inker Stan Kaye

Batman_130

Detective Comics #140 October, 1948- “The Riddler
Executive Editor Whitney Ellsworth, Cover Artist Win Mortimer, Writer Bill Finger, Penciler Dick Sprang, Inker Charles Paris, and Editor Jack Schiff

Detective_Comics_140

Episode 79 – “Batman’s Anniversary
Original Air date: 2/8/67
Written by William R. D’ Angelo and Directed by James B. Clark

These episodes were the 3rd episodes in the series to be made up of a mixture of elements from not one but two different comic stories. One of which is Detective Comics #140 October, 1948 – “The Riddler” – which is The Riddler’s origin story. The second story is Batman #130, March 1960 – “Batman’s Deadly Birthday” – a story in which Batman is honored with a series of birthday celebrations. Although for the TV Series the celebrations for Batman were turned into anniversary celebrations.

This was done to celebrate the one year anniversary of the Batman TV Series. The series began on January 11th and 12th 1966. And while the episodes “Batman’s Anniversary” and “A Riddling Controversy” aired on February 8th and 9th, 1967 the inter-office correspondence letter for the episodes is dated January 10th and 11th 1967.

Commissioner Gordon summoning Batman to a location for a party is the first thing to be taken from “Batman’s Deadly Birthday.” In “Batman’s Deadly Birthday” Batman is summoned to Commissioner Gordon’s office for a surprise birthday party, but in “Batman’s Anniversary” the idea is modified as it’s the Gotham Plaza Hotel that Commissioner Gordon summons Batman to for a surprise anniversary party.

The idea of the dairymen donating a cash cow to Batman to give to his favorite charity was also an idea that was taken from “Batman’s Deadly Birthday.” Although the cash cow he was given in “Batman’s Deadly Birthday” was silver and not gold like it was in the “Batman’s Anniversary”.

The cash cows that are donated to Batman in “Batman’s Deadly Birthday” and “Batman’s Anniversary” are both stolen. But the one in “Batman’s Deadly Birthday” is stolen by an unnamed villain off-panel. Whereas the cash cow in “Batman’s Anniversary” is stolen on screen by The Riddler.

The Riddler hijacking a media outlet to send Batman and Robin riddles was an idea that was used in “Detective Comics #140.” In “Detective Comics #140” The Riddler hijacked the “cross cleaning company” which presented people with nightly crossword puzzles, and presented Batman and Robin with the following crossword puzzle answers Basin, Street, and The Banquet. The Riddler in “Batman’s Anniversary” presented Batman with the same answers, but he did it through the Gotham City Herald Newspaper.

The flooded bank idea which these episodes have been criticized for actually comes from “Detective Comics #140.” The difference being that The Riddler managed to rob and escape the bank that he flooded before Batman could get there. In “Batman’s Anniversary” Batman and Robin arrived at the flooded bank just in time to stop The Riddler and his henchmen from leaving with the stolen money.

The following riddle was created for the show as a lead in to the giant cake deathtrap which was used in “Batman’s Deadly Birthday.”

When is a man drowned but still not wet?
The answer is when he is trapped in quicksand.

Both stories feature the idea of someone being sung to while someone else was trapped in the giant cake deathtrap’s icing. In “Batman’s Anniversary” when Batman and Robin were trapped in the giant cake deathtrap’s quicksand icing The Riddler and his cohorts sarcastically sang “Happy Anniversary to You Batman.” However, in “Batman’s Deadly Birthday” Batman trapped an unnamed villain in the giant cake deathtrap’s wet plaster icing, while the crowd who came out to celebrate Batman’s birthday sung “Happy Birthday to You Batman,”

Episode 80 – “A Riddling Controversy
Original Air date: 2/9/67
Written by William R. D’ Angelo and Directed by James B. Clark

The Riddler informs Batman and Robin that he will rob the Eagle’s Nest next. In “Detective Comics #140” he does this with a giant puzzle. In “A Riddling Controversy” it is done in the form of a riddle that Batman and Robin are made aware of after they escaped from the giant cake deathtrap.

When is an eagle’s nest blessed best?
The answer is when there are nest eggs.

With this in mind Batman and Robin in both stories work out that The Riddler was referring to a nightclub on top of the Gotham City State Building that’s known as The Eyrie.

But while The Riddler in “Detective Comics #140” went to The Eyrie to steal Harrison Eagle’s (a millionaire collector’s) portraits, The Riddler in “A Riddling Controversy” went to The Eyrie to steal $1 billion of Anthony Aquila’s (an exile dictator from the South Americas) money.

The comparisons for this episode end when The Riddler leaves Batman to free Harrison Eagle and Anthony Aquila from the respective puzzle deathtraps that he had put them in.

Detective Comics #359 January, 1967 – “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!
Executive Editor Julius Schwartz, Cover Artists Carmine Infantino, Murphy Anderson, and Ira Schnapp, Writer Gardner Fox, Penciler Carmine Infantino, Inker Sid Greene, and Editor Julius Schwartz

163742-18058-112609-1-detective-comics (1)
Batgirl Network Presentation
Script Date: Original Script 1/16/67, Revised Final Script 1/16/67
Original Air date: It has sometimes been said that this was a pilot for a solo Batgirl series, but that is incorrect. This was always intended to be a network presentation to convince ABC that Batgirl should be added to the series.

It wasn’t shown on television as part of the Batman TV Series but it was included in several home video releases. Holy Batmania!, Batmania From Comics to Screen, The Bat plus, Bat Clips, and Hollywood Screen Tests: Take 1, are just some of the home video releases that it was included in. Recently it was included in most of the home video releases for the Batman TV Series.
Author: No Author is credited on either of the two scripts for the Batgirl Network Presentation.

The difference in costumes for Batgirl, Killer Moth, and Killer Moth’s henchmen are some of the only things that differ from what is seen in “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!.” Another notable difference is that Barbara Gordon in the comics is a natural redhead, but Barbara Gordon in the TV Series dons a Red Wig as part of her Batgirl costume. The other notable difference is Batgirl’s attraction to Batman which is an idea that is only really used in the Batgirl Network Presentation. It wasn’t something that writers were able to explore in the TV Series due to the shows reduced airtime in Season 3.

Killer Moth’s motivation to extract money from the well off by running a protection racket. Is one idea that is featured in both the “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!” and the Batgirl Network Presentation.

Kidnapping plots are used as the basis of both stories in “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!” Killer Moth and his henchmen try to kidnap what was revealed to be a dummy of Bruce Wayne until Batgirl intervenes. In the Batgirl Network Presentation it’s Bruce Wayne’s billionaire friend Roger Montrose, who Killer Moth and his henchmen try to kidnap until they’re stopped by Batman and Robin.

The Cowl that Yvonne Craig wears as Batgirl in the Network Presentation is very similar to the cowl worn by Batgirl in “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!.” Though this version is only worn for the Network Presentation as the pointy edges of the cowl left marks on her face.

As for color of the costume the colors differed from the Batgirl costume from the comics which was Black and Yellow with a Blue/Black Cape and Cowl. While the Yvonne Craig Batgirl costume is Purple and Yellow.

The Belt on Batgirl’s costume in “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!” had a Bat shaped belt buckle on it. And similar to the “New Look” Batman costume from the comics it has pellets or equipment, containers going around the rest of the belt. In contrast to this the belt of Yvonne Craig’s Batgirl costume had a rectangular shaped belt buckle which had a Bat Emblem on the inside of it. And like the TV Series Batman costume it was equipped with utility pouches.

The costumes worn by Killer Moth and his henchmen in the Batgirl Network Presentation do not resemble the costumes they wore in the comics. This could be an artistic license decision or perhaps there wasn’t enough money in the budget to accurately replicate their costumes from the comics.

An outfit that could be reversed in order to allow Barbara Gordon to undergo a tantalizing transformation from Barbara Gordon to Batgirl. Is an idea that’s used in “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!,” it is also an idea that’s used in the Batgirl Network Presentation and the Batman TV Series. Although it’s only here in the Batgirl Network Presentation that she undergoes that transformation from the Gotham City Library.

Crimefighting being an absolute thrill for Batgirl is another element from “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!.” That’s very noticeable in the Batgirl Network Presentation.

At the end of both stories Batman is left wondering whether Batgirl is a genuine member of the team or a crimefighting rival.

Thanks to Andy Fish of 66batman.com for providing me with copies of Batman #36, Batman #53, and Batman #130. I would also like to thank NJ_Batfan from 66batman.com, for letting me know that Newsrama.com’s December 2013 list of DC Comics’ Solicitations includes a trade paperback which will collect some of these stories in a book called Batman ‘66: The TV Stories Trade Paperback.

Edit: The aforementioned book was released in January 2014 but it only collected 9 of the 15 comic stories that were adapted for television.

Batman #53 June, 1949- “A Hairpin, a Hoe, a Hacksaw, a Hole In the Ground
Batman #73 October, 1952- “The Joker’s Utility Belt
Batman #121 February, 1959- “The Ice Crimes of Mr. Zero
Batman #169 February, 1965- “Partners in Plunder
Batman #171 May, 1965- “Remarkable Ruse of the Riddler
Detective Comics #230 April, 1956- “The Mad Hatter of Gotham City
Detective Comics #346 December, 1965- “Batman’s Inescapable Doom-Trap
Detective Comics #341 July, 1965- “The Joker’s Comedy Capers”
Detective Comics #359 January, 1967 – “The Million Dollar Debut of Batgirl!

The following stories weren’t included in Batman ‘66: The TV Stories Trade Paperback but they were reprinted in other books.

Detective Comics #140 October, 1948- “The Riddler” – Batman from the 30s to the 70s HC (1972), Batman: Featuring Two-Face and the Riddler TPB (1995), Batman Archives Vol. 7 HC (2008),
Batman #35 June, 1946 – “Nine Lives has the Catwoman” – Superman’s Girl Friend Lois Lane #123 (1972) and Batman:The Dark Knight Archives Vol. 8 HC (2013)
Batman #36 Aug-Sep, 1946- “The Penguin’s Nest”- Batman: The Dark Knight Archives Vol. 8 HC (2013)
Batman #161 February, 1964- “The New Crimes of the Mad Hatter” – Batman Family #6 (1976)

Batman #39 February, 1947 – “A Christmas Tale” and Batman #130, March 1960-“Batman’s Deadly Birthday” are the only comic stories that were adapted for the TV series that haven’t been reprinted in any book yet.

Source: Cinefantastique’s February 1994, special commemorative Batman issue by Bob Garcia, Lorenzo Semple, Jnr’s. November 9th, 1965 and November 15th, 1965 letters to William Dozier, Box 6, Collection Number 06851, William Dozier Papers, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming, Secret Origins of The Batman TV Show Part Four: Remarkable Ruse of the Hi Diddle Riddler! – dialbforblog.com, Max Hodge’s personal documents on “creating” Mr. Freeze, The Bat-Data Articles section of batfriend.com, Season 1 Episodes 7 and 8 – “Instant Freeze” and “Rats Like Cheese” with subtitles on – The UV version of Batman: The Complete Series, Batman 35 – Catwoman’s nine lives, Dinosaur Island, and Dick Grayson writes a comic book – babblingsaboutdccomics4.wordpress.com, Batman 39 – Catwoman’s Christmas – babblingsaboutdccomics4.wordpress.com, How the Bat and the Cat spent their Christmas during the Golden Age of Comics – by aeka from scans-daily.dreamwidth.org,

Mike Voiles from dcindexes.com, reprint guide for every comic book in existence, Untitled script for Presentation of Batgirl, 16 January 1967 18 pgs, mimeo, no author Box 40, Coll. 06851, William Dozier’s Papers, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming, “Presentation of Batgirl”, revised final script, 1/16/67. Box 6, Folder 8, Coll. 173, Finding Aid for the Frank Chapman Papers, 1960-ca. 1978, The Bat; Bat Clips article – ew.com By Frank Lovece, Batgirl on DVD – Part 2 – batgirlbat-trap.com, Adam West Naked! – Disc 2, Yvonne Craig’s comments from the Wil Shriner Batman Reunion, The Third Season – Joel Eisner’s Official Batbook: The Revised Edition, Batman Vol 1 171, 169, 73, 121, 161, 53, 35, 39, 36, and 130 – dc.wikia.com, Detective Comics Vol 1 346, 230, 341, 140, and 359 – dc.wikia.com,

*The layout of this particular entry in the series was inspired by the presentation of the credits in comics and the title cards from the Batman TV Series.

DISCUSS

%d bloggers like this: